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See John Wayne Movie at the Davis May 22

Modern Film Fest at the Davis will present a free screening of the John Wayne comedy western McLintock! on Thursday, May 22, at 7 p.m.

Doors to the theatre in the Cabarrus County Historic Courthouse at 65 Union St. S, Concord, will open at 6:30 p.m. Seating is first-come, first-served and tickets are not necessary. Modern Film Fest at the Davis is a partnership between the Cabarrus Arts Council and Modern Film Fest.
Call 704-920-2787 for more information.

Wayne, as George Washington McLintock, isn’t the only big name in the film, based loosely on Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. Maureen O’Hara plays his wife and Stefanie Powers, his daughter. Patrick Wayne and Aissa Wayne, son and daughter of The Duke, are also featured.

In the film, McLintock, known as GW, is a cattle baron and the richest man in the territory. GW is highly respected by everyone around him including the farmers who are pouring into the territories with free grants of land and the Indians who are under threat of being relocated to another reservation. He is awaiting the return of his daughter, Becky, who has been away at school for two years. His wife, who left him some years before, returns with plans to take their daughter back to the state capital with her. Between his wife, his headstrong daughter, the crooked land agent and the thieving government Indian agent, GW tries to keep the peace and do what is best for everyone.

Originally released in 1963, McLintock! is a light-hearted movie with plenty of action and comedy, including mud fights and brawls. Some of it is going to feel dated to modern viewers. For example, a pivotal scene involves Wayne chasing O’Hara, who is wearing pantaloons, through the town. When he catches, her gives her a spanking, to the delight of onlookers.

The film is directed by Andrew V. McLaglen and also features actors Yvonne de Carlo, Jerry Van Dyke, Jack Kruschen, Chill Wills, Edward Faulkner, Bruce Cabot, Perry Lopez, Michael Pate, Strother Martin, Gordon Jones, Robert Lowery, Leo Gordon, Hank Wordon, Mari Blanchard, Chuck Roberson and Bob Steele.

Folk Music’s ‘Rustic Renaissance Man’ at the Davis Theatre May 2

• The Washington Post called John McCutcheon “folk music’s rustic Renaissance man.”
• Johnny Cash said he is “the most impressive instrumentalist I’ve ever heard.”
• “He is a master at the difficult craft of the ballad,” according to the Boston Globe.
• The Washington Post called his songs “Storytelling with the richness of fine literature.”
• The Dallas Morning News said “Calling John McCutcheon a ‘folksinger’ is like saying Deion Sanders is just a football player…”
• The late Pete Seeger said he is simply “one of our country’s best songwriters.”
• Folk Alley polled its listeners to determine the “100 Essential Folk Songs,” and McCutcheon’s Christmas in the Trenches came in at number 70.
Master of a dozen traditional instruments, he has recorded 36 albums, including six that were nominated for music’s highest honor, the Grammy Award.
McCutcheon will perform at the Davis Theatre Friday, May 2, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $27 and may be purchased 24 hours a day online and at the Davis Theatre Box Office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or by phone, 704-920-2753. The Davis Theatre is located at 65 Union St. S, Concord, in the Cabarrus County Historic Courthouse.
McCutcheon plays a mix of traditional songs and original music that appeals to people of all generations and backgrounds. He’s funny, heartwarming, witty and also very, very talented.
McCutcheon grew up in Wisconsin and studied at St. John’s University in Minnesota. While he was still in college, he headed to Kentucky to learn from legendary figures of Appalachian music. This experience filled him with not only a love of home-made music, but also a sense of community and rootedness. It also helped create a storytelling style that has been compared to Will Rogers and Garrison Keillor.
McCutcheon plays concert halls and theatres but also feels at home in school auditoriums and at farm rallies. He launched the first joint tour by an American and a Russian folksinger, has headlined festivals in Australia, toured Nicaragua on behalf of children’s literacy, traveled in Chile on behalf of a women’s health initiative, written children’s books and debuted his work with symphony orchestras.
Like most good songwriters, McCutcheon writes about things that matter to people. You would expect a folksinger like him to write politically and socially conscious songs, and he does. But he also has a whole album of songs about baseball because he loves baseball. He began writing children’s songs after his first child was born and he is now a grandfather. He has collaborated with some of his favorite authors, including North Carolinian Lee Smith, on literary songs. His stories introducing his songs are so good that he has appeared multiple times at the National Storytelling Festival.
Read more about him at www.folkmusic.com.

Malpass Brothers to Play Traditional Country Music April 10

The Malpass Brothers will present a traditional country music show on Thursday, April 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the Davis Theatre. The performance is sold out; if you would like to be placed on a waiting list for any returned tickets, call 704-920-2753.

Chris and Taylor Malpass are a couple of 20-something brothers from eastern North Carolina who grew up listening to their grandfather’s records and now tour as Merle Haggard’s opening act. They play music steeped in the legacy of the Louvin Brothers, Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Sr. and the like. Don’t let the Porter Wagoner hairdos fool you, though, as they are not pretending to be anything. Their agent deemed them as authentic as grits, country ham and North Carolina barbecue and he’s absolutely right.

Besides playing on Haggard’s tours, the brothers have toured with the late Don Helms, former steel guitarist for Hank Williams and shared billing with Ray Price, Willie Nelson, Rhonda Vincent, Marty Stuart and Doc Wilson. They’ve played at Merlefest and at the Grand Ole Opry’s famed Ryman Auditorium and in locales as far-flung as the Shetland Islands. They have also recorded CDs of their own music, one of which made the “CMT Pure Country Top 10.”

Here’s what a couple of reviewers have said about them:
• “George Jones once recorded a song called ‘Who’s Gonna Fill Their Shoes’ which wondered if great country singers would come along in the future to take the place of the great old ones form the past … well, George, maybe your prayer has been answered. These guys don’t just sound retro. They are retro.” –Dan McIntosh, Roothog Radio
• “The biggest surprise of the night… You were transported back 50 years… pure talent.” –The Californian

Click for more information about the Malpass Brothers.

Art Walk April 4 Features Artist Demonstration

Salisbury artist Ingrid Erickson takes scissors, ranging from one-inch folding scissors to full-size shears, X-Acto blades and utility knives and creates wonderful artwork. She will demonstrate how she makes her intricate paper cuttings Friday, 6-9 p.m., during Art Walk at The Galleries.

Erickson fell in love with the art of paper cutting when she lived in China and Thailand 2004-2006. Nature is her chief inspiration and she also draws insight from textiles, printmaking, Asian screens and scrolls. Her work is included in The Galleries’ new exhibition, The Orient Express.

Her work has been featured in a number of museums and gallery shops including the Kemper Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO; Women and Their Work Gallery in Austin, TX; The Holter Museum of Art in Helena, MT; Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE: The Figge Art Museum in Davenport, IA; Province Art Association Museum in Provincetown, ME: and The Croft Art Gallery in Waco, TX. Closer home, her work has been in shows at the Hickory Museum of Art and Four Corners Framing and Gallery in Mooresville. Locally, her work can be found at The Green Goat Gallery in Spencer and Southern Spirit Gallery.

Art Walk, which is organized by the Cabarrus Arts Council, will feature visual art displays and entertainment all over downtown Concord and beyond. A highlight will be the opening reception for The Orient Express at The Galleries. The show contains artwork representing Orientalism and its influence on contemporary art and craft by 15 artists, several who will be on hand: Margaret Agner, Jim Connell, Kim Dills, Ingrid Erickson, C. Shana Greer, Michael Hamlin-Smith, Marcia Jested, Matt Kelleher, Po-Wen Liu, Betty Helen Longhair, Gillian Parke, Lee Snipe, Timothy Sullivan, Karen James Swing and Yuko Ngami Taylor.

“The show explores how Eastern history, developments and culture have impacted viewpoints through artwork in Western culture,” said Rebecca Collins, arts council Visual Arts Director and curator for The Orient Express. “We see the translation of 19th century Orientalism into modern times.”

There will be a free shuttle from The Galleries to ClearWater Artist Studios which is hosting Rowan Cabarrus Community College’s Step into Culture event for the community. The diverse cultural experience includes music, live artist demonstrations, poetry, spoken word, a student art gallery, food trucks and vendor tables. Step into Culture is RCCC’s annual art and literary event. It begins at noon and some RCCC classes will be relocated to ClearWater Artist Studios for the day. For more information, contact Jenny Billings Beaver (704-216- 3797) or Jenny Selby (704-216- 3820).

After Art Walk at 9 p.m., there will be a free film screening of short films made as part of the 48-Hour Film Project at the Davis Theatre. The 48-Hour Film Project is a contest in which teams of filmmakers are assigned a genre, a character, a prop and line of dialogue and have 48 hours to create a short film containing those elements. The theatre will open at 8:30 p.m. Seating is first-come, first-served and no tickets are required. Click for more information about the films.
For more information, call the arts council at 704-920-2787. Download the map.

Traditional Country Music at the Davis April 10

If you like traditional country music, you are going to love The Malpass Brothers!

Chris and Taylor Malpass are a couple of 20-something brothers from eastern North Carolina who grew up listening to their grandfather’s records and now tour as Merle Haggard’s opening act. They play music steeped in the legacy of the Louvin Brothers, Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Sr. and the like. Don’t let the Porter Wagoner hairdos fool you, though, as they are not pretending to be anything. Their agent deemed them as authentic as grits, country ham and North Carolina barbecue and he’s absolutely right.

The Malpass Brothers will bring their band, which includes their father, to the Davis Theatre Thursday, April 10, at 7:3 p.m. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased 24 hours a day online at CabarrusArtsCouncil.org and at the Davis Theatre Box Office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or by phone, 704-920-2753.

Besides playing on Haggard’s tours, the brothers have toured with the late Don Helms, former steel guitarist for Hank Williams and shared billing with Ray Price, Willie Nelson, Rhonda Vincent, Marty Stuart and Doc Watson. They’ve played at Merlefest and at the Grand Ole Opry’s famed Ryman Auditorium and in locales as far-flung as the Shetland Islands. They have also recorded CDs of their own music, one of which made the “CMT Pure Country Top 10.”

Here’s what a couple of reviewers have said about them:
• “George Jones once recorded a song called ‘Who’s Gonna Fill Their Shoes’ which wondered if great country singers would come along in the future to take the place of the great old ones form the past … well, George, maybe your prayer has been answered. These guys don’t just sound retro. They are retro.” –Dan McIntosh, Roothog Radio
• “The biggest surprise of the night… You were transported back 50 years… pure talent.” –The Californian
For more information about the Malpass Brothers, visit www.themalpassbrothers.com.

Jazz Concert March 21 at the Davis Theatre

Jazz singer Sachal Vasandani and his band will play at the Davis Theatre Friday, March 21, at 8 p.m.

The performance is part of the Davis Theatre’s flagship On Stage at the Davis series. Tickets are $36 and may be purchased 24 hours a day online and at the Davis Theatre Box Office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or by phone, 704-920-2753.\

Here’s what some reviewers have said about the singer/songwriter:

“Every now and again you hear a special voice that makes you sit up and take notice….Sachal Vasandani has that voice.” – Michele Norris, NPR’s All Things Considered

“This clever, youngish crooner/songwriter has concocted a cool modern style that neatly elides facile comparisons to Sinatra and Bennett. And while the former investment banker never kidnaps the standards that comprise most of his terrific new album Hi-Fly into totally unfamiliar places, you always know they’ve been submitted to a serious rethinking.” – The Village Voice

Vasandani, who is Indian-American, was born in Chicago into a family that appreciated all kinds of music. His parents listened to a variety of jazz, from Duke Ellington to Keith Jarrett, which piqued his curiosity. In pursuing his love for music at the University of Michigan, he began to be recognized as a talent of the future, most notably by DownBeat magazine, which awarded him Collegiate Jazz Vocalist of the year in 1999.

After moving to New York City, Vasandani quickly became part of the club jazz scene and was chosen for guest performances and recordings, notably by the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, Wycliffe Gordon, Eric Reed and T.S. Monk. Signed to Mack Avenue Records in 2006, he has recorded three well-reviewed CDs, including “We Move,” which Jazz Times proclaimed “one of the best CD releases of the year.”

The Davis Theater show is one of only two for Vasandani and his band this spring in North Carolina. Vasandani spent February and the first part of March in Europe, playing in France, England, Germany, Greece, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Denmark, Italy, Algeria and Czech Republic. After the North Carolina performances, he will do four shows at the University of California before heading off for a tour of Mexico.

Read more about Sachal Vasandani and listen to some of his music at www.sachalvasandani.com.

First Davis Theatre Family Matinee March 15

The Davis Theatre will present its first family matinee Saturday, March 15, at 3 p.m.

The performance will feature Trout Fishing in America, a Grammy-nominated musical duo whose program has nothing to do with fishing. Tickets are $12 for children under 12 and $14 for adults. Tickets may be purchased online 24 hours a day or at the box office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or via telephone, 704-920-2753.

Trout Fishing in America is a musical duo that plays some of the best children’s and family music around. With songs like “My Hair Had a Party Last Night,” “Hello, My Chicken Thinks He’s a Dog” and “When I Was a Dinosaur,” they have won the hearts of children and their parents all over America. They have been honored with four Grammy nominations and won multiple Parents Choice and Indie Awards.

Ezra Idlet and Keith Grimwood call their songs “music for people who take their fun seriously.” They have played together for more than three decades and clearly have fun doing their inclusive mix of music and storytelling. They will have children (and their parents and grandparents) smiling, clapping and singing along.

Kids get a kick out of the fact that Idlet is A LOT taller (more than a foot) than Grimwood. Idlet, who plays guitar and banjo, attended college on a basketball scholarship but left early to pursue his true love, music. Grimwood, meanwhile, was putting himself through college by playing pop music in local clubs. They met as members of Houston folk/rock band St. Elmo’s Fire. After the band dissolved, Trout Fishing in America was born. The name came from Grimwood’s love of Richard Brautigan’s writing, including his book by the same name, and Idlet’s love of fishing.

One of the nicest things about the pair’s music is that adults enjoy it as much as children. They are willing to make fun of our most annoying habits in one song, and then touch our hearts with tender and compassionate images of family life in the next.

If you have children at your house or in your family, you don’t want to miss this performance. You’ll see why NPR called them the “Lennon and McCartney of kid’s music.”

For more information or to listen to a few songs, visit www.troutmusic.com.

Brand New Opry at the Davis Theatre March 6

The very popular Brand New Opry bluegrass show is returning to the Davis Theatre Thursday, March 6, at 7:30 p.m., for its final show of the 2013-14 season.

Tickets are $15 and may be purchased 24 hours a day online and at the Davis Theatre Box Office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or by phone, 704-920-2753. The Davis Theatre is located at 65 Union St. S, Concord, in the Cabarrus County Historic Courthouse.

Brand New Opry is an all bluegrass performance hosted by Jeff Whittington and featuring an all-star line-up of some of the best musicians in our area: Whittington, banjo; John Culbreath, fiddle; Pete Corum, bass: Mike Wood, guitar; and Jason Wood, mandolin.

Brand New Opry host Whittington performed on the Grand Ole Opry and was a staff musician with the Arthur Smith Show. He has been featured on commercials and movie soundtracks. A former North Carolina Banjo Champion, he plays banjo, pedal steel, Dobro, and guitar with the Brand New Opry.

Culbreath has performed with such bluegrass greats as Vassar Clements and Mac Wiseman, as well as being a former SC State Banjo Champion. He plays fiddle, guitar, mandolin, and banjo.

Corum toured with bluegrass legend Lester Flatt’s Nashville Grass, playing at the Grand Ole Opry, on television and all over the United States and Canada, and appeared Off Broadway and in the movie Cotton Patch Gospel. He plays bass and sings.

Mike Wood began his career at the age of 14 as guitar player for his father and renowned banjoist, Al Wood and the Smokey Mountain Boys. His first major show was Bill Monroe’s world famous bluegrass festival in Bean Blossom, Indiana. In the 1980s, he joined with mandolinist Herschel Sizemore to form the Country Grass. He also sings bluegrass-gospel with his wife and family band, The Wood Family Tradition.

Jason Wood, Mike Wood’s son, began playing guitar when he was 7, began playing bass with his grandfather’s band when he was 13 and took up his main instrument, the left-handed mandolin, at 17. He toured with Constant Change and recorded “The Song of the Mountain” with bluegrass legend Curly Seckler. He also has played with Audie Blaylock and Redline and The Band.

For more information, call 704-920-2753.

Seven Silent Films to Be Shown at the Davis Theatre February 27

A collection of silent films that were believed lost will be shown at the Davis Theatre on Thursday, Feb. 27.

The free screening of Seven Silent Films will be at 7 p.m. in the Davis Theatre at 65 Union St. S, Concord, in the Cabarrus County Historic Courthouse. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and seating is first come, first served. No tickets are required. Modern Film Fest at the Davis is a partnership between the Cabarrus Arts Council and Modern Film Fest.

The films were exhibited around the world 100 years ago, then they were lost. They were rediscovered in a sea chest at a flea market in California and restored by the American Film Institute.
The films range from the first known film to feature an all-black cast to slapstick comedy to drama:
• A Fool and His Money. Directed by Alice Guy-Blaché, the first woman film director, this 11-minute movie features an all-black cast. The film, originally released in 1912, is about a laborer in love with a rich girl. He finds money and poses as a rich man.
• The City of Singapore is a 1911 five-minute travelogue about the Asian city.
• “Gertrude Norman Film.” We don’t know the title of this sad 1910 film about a little girl who dies in a fire. There is a warning at the beginning of the 10-minute film that it contains a death scene.
• The Lucky Holdup. Two old businessmen quarrel and then later learn their son and daughter are in love. This is the only known film from the early career of silent era star Dorothy Gibson. Many sources say she is a Titantic survivor, but the booklet with Seven Silent Films says she had a ticket but missed the ship. Some of this 1912 film is missing because it couldn’t be restored; about eight minutes remain.
• The New Sign of the Globe Hotel. This 1910 film is about a group of workers trying to place a large globe sign on top of a hotel. They lose control of the globe and it rolls around wreaking havoc. The film runs four minutes, 42 seconds.
• Distractions of Foolshead. This film stars André Chapuis, who was a top French comic actor in the early 20th century and made more than 100 films, including this one, as “Cretinetti.” Duirng the eight-minute film, Cretinetti experiences a great deal of slapstick misfortune including falling out of a window, lighting a cigarette next to a gas can and knocking over the hats in a shop.
• The Count of Monte Cristo. This almost 16-minute version of the classic novel is directed by and stars Francis Boggs. It is a complete performance of the tale as a stage play, including curtains between acts. It also includes the earliest known film of the San Diego coast.

For more information about the screening, call 704-920-2787.

Carolina Gator Gumbo at the Davis Theatre February 20

Carolina Gator Gumbo will bring its high-energy mix of Cajun and Creole music to the Davis Theatre on Thursday, February 20.

The performance will be at 7:30 p.m. in the theatre located in the historic Cabarrus Courthouse at 65 Union St. S, Concord. Tickets are $13 and may be purchased 24 hours a day online at CabarrusArtsCouncil.org and at the Davis Theatre Box Office Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., in person or by phone, 704-920-2753. All seats are reserved.

This well-seasoned Cajun and Creole band has been bringing the festive music from southwest Louisiana to the Carolinas since the early 1990s. They have sought and studied Cajun/Creole music, dance and culture throughout the Southeast and love to spread the infectious joy found in the music from the bayou. Carolina Gator Gumbo includes Jean Prewitt, accordion and vocals; Don Cowan, guitar; Carole Outwater, bass and vocals; Trent Van Blaricom, fiddle and rubboard; and Matt Haney, lap steel and fiddle.

The line-up of five musicians living well North of Louisiana found their way to Cajun and Creole music 20 to 30 years ago and just had to bring it back home. The current band line-up includes three original members – Prewitt, Cowan and Outwater – who live in Charlotte and newcomers Van Blaricom and Haney.

Concord native Prewitt’s energy and rapport with the audience makes her a natural for taking center stage with the band. She loves Cajun and Creole culture, music, dance and food and loves to pass on the music husband and and traditions wherever she goes. She and her fellow band member husband Cowan have been visiting Louisiana for many years, broadening their experiences and understanding of the culture.

Guitarist Cowan is a driving force and the band’s rhythm anchor. A charter member of the Charlotte Folk Society, his involvement in music goes back many years and includes old time and blues as well as Cajun and Creole. Both Cowan and Prewitt have studied and played with many of the masters of the genre.

Outwater adds bass and vocals to the band. She is an award-winning autoharp player on the regional & national level teaches a variety of workshops, including Cajun and Creole music on the autoharp. She has recorded the CD, “Faces” and is featured on another, “Autoharp Legacy.”

Blaricom of Asheville has formed Cajun and zydeco bands in Atlanta, Washington, DC, and Asheville. He has performed at the Smithsonian Institute and for the Jamaican Embassy. He currently leads Asheville’s Zydeco Ya Ya playing a blend of red hot rhythmic zydeco, swamp pop & cajun swing.

Haney of Chapel Hill formerly lived in Minnesota and played with The Bone Tones Cajun Band, one of the first non Louisiana Cajun bands. He has toured with Tracy Schwartz Cajun Trio.

To listen to Carolina Gator Gumbo, visit www.carolinagatorgumbo.com.